Directed by Chloe Zhao, Nomadland is a quietly chaotic, yet endearing film that follows Fern, played by Frances McDormand, who has chosen to live life on the road in a van she calls "Vanguard."

Zhao, whose debut feature film, Songs My Brothers Taught Me, received nominations for Best Film and Best Director at the Independent Spirit Awards, has received more acclaim with Nomadland being nominated for six Academy Awards and two Golden Globe wins.

The film is a unique look at van life and modern nomads. McDormand is such a natural in her role that I forgot I was watching a character on screen. I had to remind myself I was not watching a documentary.

Jessica Bruder, author of the book, Nomadland, spent years and put many miles on her van as she crossed the country documenting the subculture. She joined the film as consulting producer.

A nomad is defined as a member of a people or tribe that has no permanent abode but moves about from place to place, usually seasonally and often following a traditional route or circuit according to the state of pasturage or food supply; any wanderer (dictionary.com).

Fern moves from job to job and place to place often with eyes of worry and loneliness. Along the way she meets several nomads at different stages of life as they deal with their own personal struggles. She also encounters those who do not understand her choice of living.

To truly appreciate this film it may take time. I found myself enjoying it with another watch after initially not being too impressed. I am in awe, however of how the story is woven together. There are so many perspectives and stories shared through the various van dwellers. I really appreciate that.

It may sound cliche, but life is more about the journey than the destination. In life, anything can happen. We all have different perspectives, different events that got us to where we are and different stories that define us. Nomadland is a journey. The characters make this film.

Nomadland is available on Hulu.

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