covidchart

Metrics show a decrease in number of COVID-19 confirmed cases and hospitalizations statewide.

All indications are the latest COVID-19 surge may have peaked in Scott County, but health officials remain wary as cold weather nears.

“I’m hopeful the worst of the surge is behind us,” said Dr. Crystal Miller, WEDCO Health District’s public health director. “Our incident numbers are lower than they’ve been since early August. I just hope it doesn’t pick back up with cold weather moving in.”

Since Oct. 1, Scott County has reported 463 new cases of COVID-19, including 22 hospitalizations and four deaths. The county’s death toll since the pandemic began in March 2020 is now at 48.

Of the 22 hospitalizations through Oct. 17, 15 are unvaccinated, five are vaccinated and one is unknown.

“We still have disease spreading,” Miller warned. “Our number of hospitalizations is steady, but high. But their stays in the hospital do not seem to be as long.”

Interest in booster shots is high, Miller said, although there has not been much renewed interest in first-time vaccinations. The first-time vaccination rate among pregnant women is among the lowest, and Miller urged pregnant women to speak with their doctors.

“Pregnant women think they are better off not taking the vaccine because they are pregnant,” she said. “That is simply not true.”

Scott County’s total vaccination rate is 67 percent, among the highest in the state.

Each Friday, the Scott County Public Health Department holds its COVID-19 clinic from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at its offices on Washington Street in Georgetown.

Statewide, the metrics used to measure the pandemic have shown a decrease in the number of confirmed cases and hospitalizations. On Friday, the latest state report, showed 31 deaths, but that total did not include Clark County Judge-Executive Chris Pace who died Thursday from COVID.

The state reports its seven-day infection rate at 36.85 daily cases per 100,000 residents. Scott County’s rate is 29.3, but several counties such as Russell at 84.5, Powell at 76.3 and Owsley at 71.2, are nearly twice that rate. The rate for neighboring counties is Fayette, 27.1; Woodford, 32.1; Bourbon, 50.5; Franklin, 40.6, Owen, 31.5 and Harrison, 54.5.

 

Mike Scogin can be reached at mscogin@news-graphic.com.

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